ANATOLIA

ANATOLIA

There is archaeological evidence supporting that the Anatolian people were amongst the first to utilize flat-loom weaving during the Neolithic period (approximately 10,000 B.C.)

Anatolian rugs have a vivid color palette. These Turkish rugs are geometric with the exception of Hereke and Ushak.
They are easily distinguishable due to their wide borders surrounded by minor borders. One can observe Kufic calligraphy in these borders.

TEHRAN

TEHRAN

The color palette for Tehran rugs is a rich scarlet and powerful cerulean contrasting with alabaster.
They are city weave, bright color, and find green, red, vase design (a motif) and fine weave.4 x 6 to 7 x 10
The weavers in Tehran use Persian knots. The warps are mostly cotton while the wefts can be either cotton or wool. Ultimately the artisans create a thin, tight pile with soft wool.

HERIZ-SERAPI

HERIZ-SERAPI

Heriz rugs stand out due to their geometric shapes. As a trademark, they have a large, eight-sided medallion.

Typically the color palette is salmon, burnt sienna, and sky blue for modern day pieces. Antique Persian rugs have a darker tinge of burnt sienna, beige, and turquoise.

A majority of Heriz carpets are mid-size (4 x 6 to 8 x 10 feet.) A large rug can run up to 15 x 24 feet as a thin, tight pile.

The texture is a soft wool while the foundation has a cotton warp and the weft can be either cotton or wool. The weavers use Turkish knots.

TABRIZ

TABRIZ

Tabriz carpets are highly prized for the graceful rendering of motif and the meticulous details –trademark of Safavid work.
There’s a rich history tracing back as early as the Sassanid era (224 to 651 A.D.)
Scarlet red and cerulean contrasts with ivory to create a staple look for Tabriz rugs. In modern day Persian rugs, one can find a gentle green, sapphire, and burnt sienna as a running theme. The patterns are curvilinear.
The antique Oriental rugs are composed of a velvety wool. Reaching the dimensions of (4 x 6 to 8 x 10 feet), the Tabriz rug is a thin, tight pile.
Sometimes, one can find a large one running up to (10 x 18 feet.) The warps are commonly cotton as are the wefts (although wefts can also be wool.)
The weavers in Tabriz use both Turkish and Persian knots.

SHIRAZ

SHIRAZ

The Shiraz Oriental rugs sport nomadic patterns with medallions. Scarlet and terracotta indicates that the carpet is Shiraz although modern day ones can be a gentle green and khaki.
These Persian rugs are ideal for any home due to its durability (tribal rugs are built sturdier than city rugs.)
A majority of Shiraz rugs are mid-size (4 x 6 to 8 x 10 feet.) Rarely, they can reach the dimensions of (10 x 18 feet.)
The foundation is primarily wool (although wefts can be cotton.) Usually, this Persian carpet is flat woven.

SAROUK

SAROUK

Sarouk Mohajran – Sarouk Farahan

In the early 20th century, Sarouk carpets were sought after and exported to the American market. In particular, the all over floral patterns were in demand.

Due to the washing process at the time, it lightened the natural dyes and dealers began to the restore the color with a second dye.

The booming popularity for the bold colors led to a new type of rug a “painted Sarouk.” In modern day, dealers acquire “painted Sarouks” rugs to restore them to their original, authentic dyes –what many in the industry refer to as a “stripped Sarouk.”

These Oriental rugs come in a variety of styles and deviations. Traditional designs are either all-over consisting of Herati, boteh, or gul hannai motifs or in a medallion layout with many geometric designs and angular floral shapes.

The primary colors utilized are as listed: scarlet, cerulean, burnt orange, ocher, and champagne. American styles are inclined to showcase crimson red and a variation of cerulean.

A majority of Sarouk carpets are mid-sized (4 x to 8 x 10 feet.) All Sarouks are made with wool: antique Persian rugs use kork wool with a very short to short cut while more modern day ones use excellent wool with a medium high to high cut.

Weavers in Sarouk use Persian knots however: antique Sarouk weavers used Turkish knots. The foundation is primarily made of cotton (warps and wefts).